Johann Pachelbel (1653-1706)

 

We continue our series RISM A-Z with Johann Pachelbel (1653-1706). Organists certainly do not need convincing that Johann Pachelbel wrote more than just the Canon in D! Jean M. Perreault breaks down the numbers like this in his Thematic Catalogue of the Musical Works of Johann Pachelbel: Of the 528 entries, 421 works are keyboard instrument pieces (more than half of which are for organ), 89 vocal pieces, 16 chamber music pieces (including the famous Canon), and 2 pedagogical works. The 486 Pachelbel sources in RISM reflect this distribution as well.

Somewhat surprising is the fact that only three printed editions appeared during Pachelbel's lifetime:


Yet Pachelbel is one of the seventeenth-century composers who was never completely forgotten. An example of this can be seen in a manuscript copy of the Canon and Gigue in D, which dates from around 1840 and is today in Berlin.

Johann Pachelbel had two sons who were also composers. Wilhelm Hieronymus Pachelbel (1686-1764) was an organist in Nuremberg and Carl Theodorus Pachelbel (1690-1750) spent much of his career in the American colonies.


Image: Title page of Hexachordum Apollinis (RISM A/I: P 36) from the Bayerische Staatsbibliothek (D-Mbs), available online.

Category: RISM A-Z



Next article >
< Previous article

Comments

This article has no comments yet.
Add a comment

Please fill in all fields! Your email address will not be displayed.




CAPTCHA image for SPAM prevention
Code unreadable? Please click here.

Subscribe with your RSS reader

COPYRIGHT

All news entries are by the RISM Central Office staff unless otherwise noted. Reuse of RISM's own texts is permitted under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License—though please note that image credits and permissions are usually separate and noted at the bottom of each post. If authorship is attributed to someone else (indicated at the start of an entry and/or by a name following the word "Contact"), please contact the individual authors.